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Our Mission

Three Degrees Warmer works to understand and address the human impacts of climate change and to assist communities in moving beyond climate risk toward more just, healthy, and secure futures.

 

Our Story

 

We are in trouble, friends. In 2007, when we met during our first week of law school, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projected a three degrees Celsius rise in global average temperature this century. We founded Three Degrees as a way of asking ourselves and each other what a Three Degrees Warmer world would look like. We organized in 2009 the Three Degrees Conference on the Law of Climate Change and Human Rights, with panelists from 45 countries and 5 continents convening in Seattle over a fictitious disaster scenario set in 2050. Climbing Poetree, two multi-media artists, opened the conference by confronting the injustice of the rise of “unnatural disasters” and Mary Robinson, former President of Ireland, delivered the keynote. The convening—the people and work we assembled—continues to drive and inspire our work today. Three Degrees is a climate justice organization, one arguing that climate change is a human rights issue for which the industrialized world is largely responsible. Climate justice forces us to confront the obligations and responsibilities of nations most responsible for climate change to support communities most imminently affected.

Image © Peter Essick

Supreme Court Will Not Hear Public Trust Case

Three Degrees Warmer, in partnership with Our Children’s Trust and its national network of legal supporters, filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court last month. Today, we learned that the Supreme Court declined to hear the case…

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“Maybe freedom cannot be attained through human institutions but must remain a quality of the mind or spirit not dependent on circumstances, a gift of grace…We can attain by our own efforts only an imperfect justice, a limited freedom. Better than none. Let us hold fast to that principle, the love of Freedom, of which the freed slave, the poet, spoke.”

– Ursula Le Guin